Learning Photography and How to Do So

There have been instances throughout history where people have been successful only when they did what they loved to do, not just as a hobby but as a profession as well. For many people, the daily grind of 9-5 is not as pleasing and they feel suffocated. Their hobbies and personal interests are their saving grace. There are a number of avenues that people can go down as far as their hobbies are concerned and turn them into a full time job.

There are endless opportunities which turn out to be full time jobs and people don’t feel a burden at all, because of their interests.

The proliferation of cameras and the influence it has on young minds has changed the photography scenario by wide margins and this has come up as a new youth centric platform. People aspire to be full time photographers and have started taking full time and part time photography courses as per their needs and level of skill.

The skill of capturing memories through photographs can be intoxicating and once the adrenaline seems pumping, not because of adventure, but because of the power of a lens, the photographers can simply not rest until their vision is portrayed on a canvas.

Earlier, it was difficult to find good photography courses, due to lack of facilities and infrastructure. But, modernization came as a blessing in disguise and now people have access to all that they require within the country. From high end gadgets to efficient setting classrooms for practice, photography schools make a note of everything being perfect.

Different people have different career goals and look at a profession distinctly. While some people delve deep into the digital world, some of them go for freelance projects and love to explore. There are people who go the traditional way as well and find themselves munching on specifics of lenses, cameras and a lot more.

The boom in photography has created multiple options for every photographer to learn from. But, with perks come limitations as well. With the opening of multiple photography schools, judging the traits of a school turns out to be arduous. Keeping a few things in the head before opting for a school can help save a lot of hassle and can also help you go a long way in the future.

Set your goals

Plan first and then take a step. Think about what your expectations are and what level of skill do you require.

Start searching

When you are sure about your goals, find the course you want to continue with. Browse the internet and search different websites to learn about what is being offered in which course.

Check the syllabus and instructors

Classes once shortlisted, check the syllabus of each and then evaluate according to what seems best for you.

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13 Bad Habits That Can Ruin Your Photography

Do this simple test below. For each bad habit, give yourself a test score.


The best camera is the one you have with you – even if it’s on your smart phone. Not every photo you take is photography competition material, or is of commercial value. Regardless, a huge megapixel count and optimum lens quality on a DSLR is useless if left at home.


Those little storage cards are hugely expensive, but the temptation to be frugal will bite you on the bum. Murphy’s Law states that your memory card will fill up precisely when you’re shooting that ‘money shot'; when the light is right; or when the entire group is all smiling at you. The remedy? Buy more memory cards.


I know a friend who fills up a memory card with images, then buys another, fill that up, then buys another – a dangerous habit! He recently confessed he’s lost some of his precious photos. Personally, I have experienced the pain of having a hard drive fail, losing more than a year’s commercial photography work. To be super-secure, you really should store your photographs in three different locations.


Constantly checking your images on the LCD display is called chimping. Nothing wrong with it, except if you’re into street photography, or at a wedding or party. You may miss that decisive moment, as you’re too engrossed in the perfectionistic tendency of chimping.


Amateur shutterbugs tend to hold the camera at head-height. However, this will produce predictable results. When shooting in a location, learn to ‘work the scene’. Drop to your knees, or even lie on the ground, searching for fresh angles. An aerial perspective can be stunning. Remember that the best tool of composition is your feet.


Look for a simple background behind your subject. For example, avoid having a telephone pole (in the distance) that appears to protrude from a person’s head. If you have a long lens, you can employ a narrow depth-of-field to blur the background. This will isolate your subject from the clutter beyond, achieving a degree of separation.


Ignore the rules of composition at your peril. If you want your photos to stand out, learn and use the Rule of Thirds, rather than place your focal point bang in the middle, like most folks do, (in blissful ignorance). Or, add dynamic by tilting your camera at an angle. Don’t forget to try different types of framing: portrait orientation versus landscape orientation. Or even a really wide panoramic crop.


Confession time… I am guilty of this. Because I trained back in the bad old days of film, when strong light was necessary to capture good images, I became a fair-weather photographer. Also, I used compact digital cameras for a decade, which were hopeless in low light situations. So I was infatuated with clear, blue skies, as cloudy skies often washed out into a white haze.

However, under a harsh, midday sun, shadows are short and therefore objects do not look three-dimensional, lacking form. Human subjects may squint into the sun, or blink. Worse, they may have an ugly ‘sun-dial’ effect under their noses! Better to pose people in the shade.

Landscapers should learn to work with softer, diffused light – this is mandatory for waterfall scenes. Thunderclouds overhead will introduce a sense of foreboding that blue skies cannot. Golden hour lighting will exude warmer tones and longer shadows.


Same old story: you buy a new camera, put the box away and the camera’s manual stays inside the plastic bag. Perhaps you were too eager to use your new gadget. Well, now it’s time to dig out the manual, and attack it with a highlighter pen.

Be methodical, and diligently work through each function of your camera. You may find features you didn’t know existed!


If you haven’t read the camera manual, your photos may suffer from the restrictions of shooting in Automatic mode. Modern cameras are amazing, and can produce great results on Auto, but not consistently. Better to take control yourself. Learn the semi-automatic shooting modes, such as Shutter or Aperture Priority. Then, if you are brave, try shooting on Manual.


This is a lazy habit to fall into. It’s much better to get a shot right in-camera, including the correct exposure, as blown-out highlights cannot be retrieved later. Another consideration is ensuring that the horizon is straight, or you will lose the edges of your image when rotating then cropping it on a computer. Use the 3×3 grid on your LCD display, or a spirit level fitted on the hot shoe.

If you shoot landscapes, buy some ND and ND Grad filters. The most useful filter is the Polariser, the effects of which cannot be replicated using software. Finally, it’s better to do a bit of gardening, removing distractions from a scene, than be forced to clone them out in Photoshop – tedious work!


JPEG files are compressed. Unfortunately, this narrows the dynamic range of your photographs, and changes the colour, according to the camera’s presets. This can’t be undone. Shoot using the RAW file format, as this is more forgiving. RAW allows you the latitude to correct exposure and colour, as well as sharpen the image, on computer software. Think of RAW files as digital negatives, that need processing and fine tuning.


We all take poor pictures, badly exposed or blurry… but there’s no need to inflict these on the unsuspecting public! Carefully select only your best images, then process these on the computer.

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11 Photo Booth Rental Tips To Consider

1. Have the photo booth available starting with the cocktail hour. Guests are often looking for something to do, and the curiosity factor is high. You get more bang for your buck starting early than going late when most guests are focused on dancing and/or saying good byes.

2. If possible keep the photo booth as close to the action as possible. You want the guest book to be full and your guests to go home with a stack of photo-strips. The closer the booth is to the bar or to the dance floor the more use it will get.

3. Think through beforehand who you want to get in the booth with at your reception. You’d be surprised how many brides and grooms almost forget to go in the booth at all because there is so much going on.

4. If you are picking out your own album for a photo guest book, I recommend using one with black pages – at least 20 of them. The photo strips and metallic gel pens for messages look fantastic on black pages.

5. If you are using the photo strips as your primary wedding favor, consider having the strip customized to include your names and the date – or a special message.

6. Tailor the photo strips to fit with the mood you are trying to set with your wedding. Color strips look great at any wedding, but we can also make them black and white, or sepia tone for a classic or retro touch.

7. To take your photo strip wedding favors to the next level, place 2″x6″ acrylic, photo strip frames at each place setting or some other style of 2″x6″ frame.

8. At the end of the evening, all the images will be placed on a CD to be used however you see fit. Consider projecting them onto a screen with an LCD projector for all to see toward the end of the reception.

9. Consider having duplicates of the photo strips printed out later to be included with thank you notes, birthday cards, holiday cards, etc.

10. As you consider your options: make sure you are comparing apples to apples. Not all photo booths are created equal – there is a photo booth for every price point – from “photo booths” that are assembled with pipe and drapes or a tripod and a back drop, to upscale, authentic, hard-sided photo booths. If aesthetics are important to you, ask your photo booth rental company to see a picture of the booth that will be at your event. Also make sure to ask for a sample of the photo strips they provide. Not all photo strips are created equal either. Image clarity and flattering lighting is not only important for the benefit of your guests, but it greatly enhances the quality of the photo guest book that is created for you.

11. Regarding props. If you go with them at all, go light. Going overboard with the props will result in a couple hundred strips of nearly anonymous people dressed up in the same costume. The magic of the photo booth happens when the curtain closes and another side of your guests personalities comes out. You want as much of the real them as possible.

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